soulhead Tribeca Film Festival Music Lovers Guide 2019

We are happy to be partnering with Tribeca Film Festival for the 4th year. Each Spring, the amazing folks at TFF gather creatives and fans alike to pay homage to some of the highest quality films anywhere on the planet. Similar to other well-known film festivals like Cannes, Sundance and Urbanworld, Tribeca showcases a wide range of movie offerings and also includes talks, performances and even a pavilion with virtual reality and other technology experiences. Started in the wake of the 9/11 disaster by Jane Rosenthal, Robert De Niro and Craig Hatkoff, Tribeca Film Festival has evolved into a major week plus long extravaganza that New York eagerly awaits each year.

This year’s program offering is certainly impressive as usual but we wanted to provide a primer for those attendees looking to check out the best of the music related offerings. Like past years, TFF will have more than enough to keep even the most snobby music fans busy. Check out the selections below by day and peep our favorites each day on social media via the #TFFMusicLoversGuide2019 hashtag and in the guide with [STAFF PICK].

Top Overall Picks

Features/Documentaries

  1. Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo! is an intimate and revealing portrait of a legend-in-the-making, Devil’s Pie—D’Angelo buzzes with the soulful intensity of its subject, Grammy Award winning R&B artist D’Angelo. Never-before-seen live footage and painfully honest interviews combine to present this once larger-than-life superstar at his most vulnerable. The film traces the unexpected path of D’Angelo’s career and personal life, from his meteoric rise to his sudden disappearance and 14 year absence from the public eye.   Tickets 
  2. Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men – On 25th anniversary of the group’s debut album, Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), the series looks back on their career with reflective interviews from each of the nine living members and never-before-seen archival footage and performances. Their ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit brought them together to overcome the poverty, violence, and oppression of their neighborhoods. Music and a shared lyrical genius allowed them to form one of the most recognized musical movements in the world.   Tickets
  3. The Apollo – The Apollo Theater has been a cultural anchor on Harlem’s West 125th St. since 1934, and through its doors have passed the most legendary African American artists of the past nine decades. Academy Award® winning filmmaker and Tribeca alum Roger Ross Williams looks at the storied history of this iconic space while following the Apollo’s inaugural staging of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ acclaimed Between the World and Me. Tickets
  4. Other Music – Other Music was not just a record store in the village. it was a place where a generation discovered groundbreaking artists who became larger than life icons in the music scene. It was a destination for music lovers, musicians, and industry representatives, where bands were formed and careers were launched. Other Music was and remains a symbol of independent music. It was a place that not only spotlighted those in independent music, but also served as a great influence on the music scene in New York City. Tickets
  5. The Remix: Hip-Hop X Fashion – As hip hop music was taking off in the late 80s and 90s, associated fashion trends and styles were also making their voice heard. And both were largely dominated by men. But as the voices of Mary J. Blige, Missy Elliott, and Lil’ Kim grew louder, so too did the influence of their female designers and stylists working behind the scenes. Tickets
  6. Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica – While Bob Marley may be most closely associated with the heyday of reggae music, there are others who did not achieve international stardom, ones who remain popular in Jamaica and among reggae fans, singers and songwriters who maintain the spiritual and social values reflected in their music from the 70s and 80s. Now they will once again sing about those values, as relevant as ever, on an international tour. Inna de Yard captures the musicians—among them Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, and Cedric Myton—as they reacquaint, swap stories, and talk of their lives as they rehearse in a studio in the hills above Kingston in a house adorned with hundreds of old LPs and 45s from back in the day.   Tickets
  7. I Want My MTV – A touchstone in the lives of millions of young people, as well as a home for musicians and filmmakers to display their frequently offbeat sense of artistic vision, upstart music network MTV burst onto televisions on August 1, 1981. Via a combination of the scrappy handful of young adults serving as hosts, the fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants production style, and the music mini-movies that were the foundation of the original channel, MTV was like nothing Americans had ever seen before. Tickets
  8. Charlie’s Records – Rawlston Charles migrated from Tobago and entered the United States in December 1967. Living in Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, NY, Charles had a vision to promote Calypso and Soca music and its artist to the world through his record store, Charlie’s Calypso City, and music label, Charlie’s Records. Charlie’s Records reveals the American Immigrant story of an unsung hero. Tickets
  9. Mystify: Michael Hutchence – In the 1980s and ‘90s, Michael Hutchence was flying high and topping the charts as the lead singer of the hugely successful Australian rock band INXS. There was, however, a darkness that always hovered behind the spotlight. Hutchence, a man who saw rock and roll as “liberation,” was a natural performer who channeled his unique brand of exuberant vocals and charismatic sex appeal onto the stage until his untimely death at the age of 37. Tickets
  10. Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice – With one of the most memorably stunning voices that has ever hit the airwaves, Linda Ronstadt burst onto the 1960s folk rock music scene in her early twenties. The lead singer of the Stone Poneys, Ronstadt eventually branched out to begin her decades long career as a solo artist, touring the world selling out stadiums and, at one point, setting the record as the highest paid female artist in rock. Most remarkable to this day is her interest in and willingness to jump into new and challenging styles of music, including opera, jazz, and Mexican folk, excelling fantastically with each. Ronstadt has also been an outspoken political advocate for causes such as same-sex marriage and the inhumane treatment of undocumented immigrants, never shying away from fighting for what she believes both on and off the stage. Tickets
  11. Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation – When business partners John Roberts and Joel Rosenman floated the idea of hosting an opening day party with live music to celebrate their new recording studio in Woodstock, New York, they had no idea what it would eventually become: a pilgrimage of 500,000 like-minded radicals and hippies to Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, where they would find spiritual reassurance and release in a celebration of freedom. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Shorts: On Tour – Music docs that speak to heart and soul. Tickets
    • Xmas Cake – This American Shelf-Life – A coming-of-middle-age story about a female singers’ journey from hot to not, and what ensues across cultures—from New York to Tokyo. Tickets
    • Lost Weekend – In 1984, two friends from small town Pennsylvania win an MTV contest and the chance to party with Van Halen for 48 Hours. Tickets
    • A Song Can’t BurnA Song Can’t Burn follows a Scottish musician working with refugee children who have crossed the border from Syria to Lebanon. Tickets
    • LazarusLazarus is a short documentary following Lazarus Chigwandali, a street musician with Albinism from Malawi as he teams up with a London-based music producer to record his debut album. Tickets
    • That’s My Jazz – Milt Abel II, a world-renowned pastry chef, reflects on his relationship with his deceased father Milton Abel Sr., famed Kansas City jazz musician. Tickets
  2. This Perfect Day (Part of Shorts: Express Yourself) – Across the street, a music store is closing. With only a few minutes to make their move, Julia (Michelle Keating) realizes it’s time for them to face their fears. Tickets

Talks

  1. Tribeca Talks: Storytellers – Questlove with Boots Riley –  Questlove is an iconic drummer, DJ, producer, culinary entrepreneur, New York Times best-selling author, and, as a member of The Roots, the unmistakable heartbeat of Philadelphia’s most influential hip-hop group. He is the Musical Director for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, where his Roots crew serves as house band. Beyond that, this five-time Grammy Award®-winning musician’s indisputable reputation has landed him musical directing positions with everyone from D’Angelo and Eminem to Jay-Z. Joining Questlove in conversation is groundbreaking musician and filmmaker Boots Riley, who is best known as the lead vocalist for the hip-hop group The Coup as well as the writer and director of the acclaimed, revolutionary breakout film Sorry to Bother You. Together, these visionary artists will discuss their boundless and eclectic careers.  Tickets
  2. Tribeca Talks: Storytellers – Rashida Jones – Versatile actor, director, screenwriter, producer, and Harvard graduate Rashida Jones will be in conversation to discuss an illustrious and accomplished career that spans across a variety of mediums. She co-wrote and starred in the indie breakout film Celeste and Jesse Forever, and received widespread acclaim for her sophomore directorial effort Quincy—an intimate portrait of her father and music legend Quincy Jones. She is the executive producer of the TNT hit-series Claws and currently stars on the TBS series Angie TribecaTickets
  3. Tribeca Talks: Queen Latifah With Dee Rees With the Premiere of Queen Shorts – Queen Latifah is a critically acclaimed and award winning musician, actor, label president, author and entrepreneur. The first hip-hop artist to be crowned with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Latifah has had immeasurable success in music and acting; she has received Grammy®, Emmy®, and Golden Globe® awards for work, as well as an Academy Award® nomination for her portrayal of Mama Morton in Chicago. The trailblazing, Academy Award®-nominated screenwriter and director Dee Rees, who directed Latifah to a SAG award for her role in the HBO film Bessie, will join Latifah in conversation to discuss her extraordinary and multifaceted career. Together, these two remarkable storytellers will cover Latifah’s creative journey from musician to actor to entrepreneur, and how she is using her influence to mentor and uplift diverse female filmmakers in order to accelerate gender and racial equality behind the camera. Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info

Events

Yesterday – Yesterday, everyone knew The Beatles. Today, only Jack remembers their songs. He’s about to become a very big deal. From Academy Award®-winning director Danny Boyle (Slumdog MillionaireTrainspotting28 Days Later) and Richard Curtis, the Oscar-nominated screenwriter of Four Weddings and a FuneralLove Actually and Notting Hill, comes a rock-n-roll comedy about music, dreams, friendship, and the long and winding road that leads to the love of your life. Tickets

DAILY TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL MUSIC LOVERS GUIDE

Wednesday, April 24, 2018

Features/Documentaries

The Apollo – The Apollo Theater has been a cultural anchor on Harlem’s West 125th St. since 1934, and through its doors have passed the most legendary African American artists of the past nine decades. Academy Award® winning filmmaker and Tribeca alum Roger Ross Williams looks at the storied history of this iconic space while following the Apollo’s inaugural staging of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ acclaimed Between the World and Me. Tickets [STAFF PICK]

Thursday, April 25, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men – On 25th anniversary of the group’s debut album, Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), the series looks back on their career with reflective interviews from each of the nine living members and never-before-seen archival footage and performances. Their ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit brought them together to overcome the poverty, violence, and oppression of their neighborhoods. Music and a shared lyrical genius allowed them to form one of the most recognized musical movements in the world.   Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Mystify: Michael Hutchence – In the 1980s and ‘90s, Michael Hutchence was flying high and topping the charts as the lead singer of the hugely successful Australian rock band INXS. There was, however, a darkness that always hovered behind the spotlight. Hutchence, a man who saw rock and roll as “liberation,” was a natural performer who channeled his unique brand of exuberant vocals and charismatic sex appeal onto the stage until his untimely death at the age of 37. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Goldie – Goldie (Slick Woods) is a street-wise, 18-year-old dancer with big dreams of big fame, even as she is stuck at home minding her two sisters while their mother is in jail. When an opportunity to audition for a real music video comes her way, Goldie feels the time has finally come for her star to rise. All she needs is the perfect canary yellow fur coat she has had her eye on in a local vintage store window. But with the day of the shoot rapidly approaching, and Goldie’s pockets still empty of the cash needed to purchase the coat, her desire for it—and its perceived promise of transformation—becomes an all-consuming obsession. Tickets

Shorts

  1. This Perfect Day (Part of Shorts: Express Yourself) – Across the street, a music store is closing. With only a few minutes to make their move, Julia (Michelle Keating) realizes it’s time for them to face their fears. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Snare (Part of Shorts: Roads Less Traveled) – At an aging Chinese restaurant in 1997, a dad (Steve Rodgers) asks his punk musician son (James Fraser) to help him follow his dreams. Tickets

Friday, April 26, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Mystify: Michael Hutchence – In the 1980s and ‘90s, Michael Hutchence was flying high and topping the charts as the lead singer of the hugely successful Australian rock band INXS. There was, however, a darkness that always hovered behind the spotlight. Hutchence, a man who saw rock and roll as “liberation,” was a natural performer who channeled his unique brand of exuberant vocals and charismatic sex appeal onto the stage until his untimely death at the age of 37. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice – With one of the most memorably stunning voices that has ever hit the airwaves, Linda Ronstadt burst onto the 1960s folk rock music scene in her early twenties. The lead singer of the Stone Poneys, Ronstadt eventually branched out to begin her decades long career as a solo artist, touring the world selling out stadiums and, at one point, setting the record as the highest paid female artist in rock. Most remarkable to this day is her interest in and willingness to jump into new and challenging styles of music, including opera, jazz, and Mexican folk, excelling fantastically with each. Ronstadt has also been an outspoken political advocate for causes such as same-sex marriage and the inhumane treatment of undocumented immigrants, never shying away from fighting for what she believes both on and off the stage. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Other Music – Other Music was not just a record store in the village. it was a place where a generation discovered groundbreaking artists who became larger than life icons in the music scene. It was a destination for music lovers, musicians, and industry representatives, where bands were formed and careers were launched. Other Music was and remains a symbol of independent music. It was a place that not only spotlighted those in independent music, but also served as a great influence on the music scene in New York City. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. Knives and Skin – Surreal forces lurk behind the fluorescent facade of an unassuming Midwestern town in Jennifer Reeder’s hyper-stylized Knives And Skin. Sophomore year of high school is upended when Carolyn Harper (Raven Whitley) suddenly vanishes after being abandoned at the lake by her jock boyfriend (Ty Olwin). In the wake of Carolyn’s mysterious disappearance, a dark abyss widens among the inhabitants of Big River as the ripples of anxiety and mistrust begin to permeate through the high school halls and beyond. In a series of intertwined suburban vignettes, fear and loss cause the members of Carolyn’s inner-circle to develop unexpected and desperate coping strategies as they slowly begin to unravel under the impact of their grief and suspicions. Tickets
  5. Goldie – Goldie (Slick Woods) is a street-wise, 18-year-old dancer with big dreams of big fame, even as she is stuck at home minding her two sisters while their mother is in jail. When an opportunity to audition for a real music video comes her way, Goldie feels the time has finally come for her star to rise. All she needs is the perfect canary yellow fur coat she has had her eye on in a local vintage store window. But with the day of the shoot rapidly approaching, and Goldie’s pockets still empty of the cash needed to purchase the coat, her desire for it—and its perceived promise of transformation—becomes an all-consuming obsession. Tickets
  6. Between Me and My Mind – Shortly through this look into the creative process of founding Phish guitarist and vocalist Trey Anastasio, it becomes clear that he is simply exploding with creativity and joy like few others. As the frontman of one of America’s longest lasting and most successful touring bands and a solo musician as well, Anastasio’s virtuosic musicianship has made him an icon, beloved by his die-hard fanbase for the depth of his artistic output and the boundless enthusiasm that he exudes on stage and off. Tickets
  7. All I Can SayShannon Hoon, the lead singer of alt rock band Blind Melon, used a Hi-8 video camera to film himself from 1990 to 1995. Until the day he died, his camera was both his diary and his closest confidant. Grammy-award winning director Danny Clinch, along with Taryn Gould, Colleen Hennessy, and Hoon himself, create a window into the late singer’s state of mind with this meticulously documented, intimate account of the frontman’s family, his creative process, his band’s rise to fame, and his struggle with addiction. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Metronome (In Time) (Part of Shorts: Streetwise) – In this wordless fable, an ailing elderly maestro (David Patrick Kelly) and a young piano prodigy (Gabriel Gurevich) venture out of their musical isolation in hopes of selling their beloved piano.  Tickets

Talks

  1. Tribeca Talks: Queen Latifah With Dee Rees With the Premiere of Queen Shorts – Queen Latifah is a critically acclaimed and award winning musician, actor, label president, author and entrepreneur. The first hip-hop artist to be crowned with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Latifah has had immeasurable success in music and acting; she has received Grammy®, Emmy®, and Golden Globe® awards for work, as well as an Academy Award® nomination for her portrayal of Mama Morton in Chicago. The trailblazing, Academy Award®-nominated screenwriter and director Dee Rees, who directed Latifah to a SAG award for her role in the HBO film Bessie, will join Latifah in conversation to discuss her extraordinary and multifaceted career. Together, these two remarkable storytellers will cover Latifah’s creative journey from musician to actor to entrepreneur, and how she is using her influence to mentor and uplift diverse female filmmakers in order to accelerate gender and racial equality behind the camera. Tickets [STAFF PICKS]

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Saturday, April 27, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo! is an intimate and revealing portrait of a legend-in-the-making, Devil’s Pie—D’Angelo buzzes with the soulful intensity of its subject, Grammy Award winning R&B artist D’Angelo. Never-before-seen live footage and painfully honest interviews combine to present this once larger-than-life superstar at his most vulnerable. The film traces the unexpected path of D’Angelo’s career and personal life, from his meteoric rise to his sudden disappearance and 14 year absence from the public eye.   Tickets  [STAFF PICK]
  2. The Apollo – The Apollo Theater has been a cultural anchor on Harlem’s West 125th St. since 1934, and through its doors have passed the most legendary African American artists of the past nine decades. Academy Award® winning filmmaker and Tribeca alum Roger Ross Williams looks at the storied history of this iconic space while following the Apollo’s inaugural staging of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ acclaimed Between the World and Me. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Mystify: Michael Hutchence – In the 1980s and ‘90s, Michael Hutchence was flying high and topping the charts as the lead singer of the hugely successful Australian rock band INXS. There was, however, a darkness that always hovered behind the spotlight. Hutchence, a man who saw rock and roll as “liberation,” was a natural performer who channeled his unique brand of exuberant vocals and charismatic sex appeal onto the stage until his untimely death at the age of 37. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice – With one of the most memorably stunning voices that has ever hit the airwaves, Linda Ronstadt burst onto the 1960s folk rock music scene in her early twenties. The lead singer of the Stone Poneys, Ronstadt eventually branched out to begin her decades long career as a solo artist, touring the world selling out stadiums and, at one point, setting the record as the highest paid female artist in rock. Most remarkable to this day is her interest in and willingness to jump into new and challenging styles of music, including opera, jazz, and Mexican folk, excelling fantastically with each. Ronstadt has also been an outspoken political advocate for causes such as same-sex marriage and the inhumane treatment of undocumented immigrants, never shying away from fighting for what she believes both on and off the stage. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  5. Other Music – Other Music was not just a record store in the village. it was a place where a generation discovered groundbreaking artists who became larger than life icons in the music scene. It was a destination for music lovers, musicians, and industry representatives, where bands were formed and careers were launched. Other Music was and remains a symbol of independent music. It was a place that not only spotlighted those in independent music, but also served as a great influence on the music scene in New York City. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  6. Knives and Skin – Surreal forces lurk behind the fluorescent facade of an unassuming Midwestern town in Jennifer Reeder’s hyper-stylized Knives And Skin. Sophomore year of high school is upended when Carolyn Harper (Raven Whitley) suddenly vanishes after being abandoned at the lake by her jock boyfriend (Ty Olwin). In the wake of Carolyn’s mysterious disappearance, a dark abyss widens among the inhabitants of Big River as the ripples of anxiety and mistrust begin to permeate through the high school halls and beyond. In a series of intertwined suburban vignettes, fear and loss cause the members of Carolyn’s inner-circle to develop unexpected and desperate coping strategies as they slowly begin to unravel under the impact of their grief and suspicions. Tickets
  7. Goldie – Goldie (Slick Woods) is a street-wise, 18-year-old dancer with big dreams of big fame, even as she is stuck at home minding her two sisters while their mother is in jail. When an opportunity to audition for a real music video comes her way, Goldie feels the time has finally come for her star to rise. All she needs is the perfect canary yellow fur coat she has had her eye on in a local vintage store window. But with the day of the shoot rapidly approaching, and Goldie’s pockets still empty of the cash needed to purchase the coat, her desire for it—and its perceived promise of transformation—becomes an all-consuming obsession. Tickets
  8. All I Can SayShannon Hoon, the lead singer of alt rock band Blind Melon, used a Hi-8 video camera to film himself from 1990 to 1995. Until the day he died, his camera was both his diary and his closest confidant. Grammy-award winning director Danny Clinch, along with Taryn Gould, Colleen Hennessy, and Hoon himself, create a window into the late singer’s state of mind with this meticulously documented, intimate account of the frontman’s family, his creative process, his band’s rise to fame, and his struggle with addiction. Tickets
  9. Gully -. Set in a dystopian Los Angeles, Gully focuses on three best friends—Calvin (Jacob Latimore), Nicky (Charlie Plummer) and Jesse (Kelvin Harrison Jr.)—who struggle to survive in the bleak and alien environment. Traumatized by troubled family relationships and socioeconomic hardships, they seek escape through video games, doing drugs, and hard partying, which provide only a temporary relief from their pain. After a shattering and unexpected discovery, the boys further lose touch with reality and lash out through dangerous acts of violence and revenge that lead to an uncertain future. Tickets
  10. This is Spinal Tap – Spinal Tap is the loudest band in England and they’re making a comeback with a North American tour promoting their new album “Smell the Glove.” Marty DiBergi (Rob Reiner) sets out to make a documentary of the legendary rock band’s exploits on the road, featuring front men Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest) and David St. Hubbins (Michael McKean) and bassist Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer), bearing witness to the highs and lows of what makes a musician into a rock star. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Shorts: On Tour – Music docs that speak to heart and soul. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
    • Xmas Cake – This American Shelf-Life – A coming-of-middle-age story about a female singers’ journey from hot to not, and what ensues across cultures—from New York to Tokyo. Tickets
    • Lost Weekend – In 1984, two friends from small town Pennsylvania win an MTV contest and the chance to party with Van Halen for 48 Hours. Tickets
    • A Song Can’t BurnA Song Can’t Burn follows a Scottish musician working with refugee children who have crossed the border from Syria to Lebanon. Tickets
    • LazarusLazarus is a short documentary following Lazarus Chigwandali, a street musician with Albinism from Malawi as he teams up with a London-based music producer to record his debut album. Tickets
    • That’s My Jazz – Milt Abel II, a world-renowned pastry chef, reflects on his relationship with his deceased father Milton Abel Sr., famed Kansas City jazz musician. Tickets
  2. This Perfect Day (Part of Shorts: Express Yourself) – Across the street, a music store is closing. With only a few minutes to make their move, Julia (Michelle Keating) realizes it’s time for them to face their fears. Tickets [STAFF PICK]

Talks

  1. Tribeca Talks: Storytellers: Jaron Lanier – Jaron Lanier, a celebrated writer, computer scientist, musician, is frequently cited for his pioneering work in Virtual Reality. He is known for charting a humanistic approach to technology appreciation and criticism, wrote books including Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now, has consulted on films such as Minority Report and The Circle, and created music with Philip Glass and T Bone Burnett. Lanier takes a singular approach to the intersection between technology and the arts, evidenced by his significant creative output. In this enticing talk, he discusses his dynamic and prolific career while illustrating the powerful connection between science, music, and storytelling. Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Events

The Wrong Man – From the mind of multi-platinum songwriter Ross Golan, The Wrong Man is an animated concept film centered around a love affair gone terribly wrong. From his holding cell on death row, the protagonist, Duran, recounts the events of his life that lead to his dreadful predicament. Set in Reno, Duran encounters the mysterious and beautiful Mariana and the two spend a passionate night together. Mariana becomes pregnant with Duran’s child, and her abusive ex-husband, insane with rage, kills her and frames Duran. Inevitably, Duran’s life spirals out of control. Wrongfully convicted, he laments his new reality as he accepts his fate. Tickets

Sunday, April 28, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo! is an intimate and revealing portrait of a legend-in-the-making, Devil’s Pie—D’Angelo buzzes with the soulful intensity of its subject, Grammy Award winning R&B artist D’Angelo. Never-before-seen live footage and painfully honest interviews combine to present this once larger-than-life superstar at his most vulnerable. The film traces the unexpected path of D’Angelo’s career and personal life, from his meteoric rise to his sudden disappearance and 14 year absence from the public eye.   Tickets  [STAFF PICK]
  2. Other Music – Other Music was not just a record store in the village. it was a place where a generation discovered groundbreaking artists who became larger than life icons in the music scene. It was a destination for music lovers, musicians, and industry representatives, where bands were formed and careers were launched. Other Music was and remains a symbol of independent music. It was a place that not only spotlighted those in independent music, but also served as a great influence on the music scene in New York City. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation – When business partners John Roberts and Joel Rosenman floated the idea of hosting an opening day party with live music to celebrate their new recording studio in Woodstock, New York, they had no idea what it would eventually become: a pilgrimage of 500,000 like-minded radicals and hippies to Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, where they would find spiritual reassurance and release in a celebration of freedom. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. All I Can SayShannon Hoon, the lead singer of alt rock band Blind Melon, used a Hi-8 video camera to film himself from 1990 to 1995. Until the day he died, his camera was both his diary and his closest confidant. Grammy-award winning director Danny Clinch, along with Taryn Gould, Colleen Hennessy, and Hoon himself, create a window into the late singer’s state of mind with this meticulously documented, intimate account of the frontman’s family, his creative process, his band’s rise to fame, and his struggle with addiction. Tickets
  5. Gully -. Set in a dystopian Los Angeles, Gully focuses on three best friends—Calvin (Jacob Latimore), Nicky (Charlie Plummer) and Jesse (Kelvin Harrison Jr.)—who struggle to survive in the bleak and alien environment. Traumatized by troubled family relationships and socioeconomic hardships, they seek escape through video games, doing drugs, and hard partying, which provide only a temporary relief from their pain. After a shattering and unexpected discovery, the boys further lose touch with reality and lash out through dangerous acts of violence and revenge that lead to an uncertain future. Tickets
  6. Sublime – Iconic California band Sublime fused reggae, punk, ska, dub, and hip-hop into a genre-defying new sound that electrified audiences and airways in the mid-1990s. Drawing a rabid fanbase around the globe, Sublime became a musical touchstone for a generation, and a lasting influence on the musicians that came after. Their behind-the-scenes story is just as absorbing—a group of friends with big ideas and big ambition, who rode the wave of growing fame to greater heights and longer nights. And while their story was interrupted by tragedy, that tragedy wouldn’t be their final chapter. Tickets
  7. Lost Transmissions – After a memorable introduction at a party, aspiring songwriter Hannah (Juno Temple) falls under the spell of talented record producer Theo Ross (Simon Pegg). As they become fast friends and begin to collaborate, Hannah discovers that Theo is a schizophrenic who refuses to take his medication. As Hannah’s career begins to take off, Theo’s condition worsens, and he lashes out at friends trying to help him. Undeterred, Hannah undertakes the difficult task of helping Theo salvage his place in the unforgiving Los Angeles music industry while at the same time getting him into treatment. The numerous obstacles thrown in her way reveal the disturbing inadequacies of mental health care in America. Tickets
  8. Plucked – Stradivari violins are some of the most sought after and valuable instruments in the world. With violins from his golden period of 1700 to 1725, it is a rare honor to lay your eyes, or hands, on one. That’s why the FBI was faced with a one-of-a-kind case when in January 2014, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Frank Almond was attacked and robbed of the Lipinski Strad—a 1715 Stradivarius violin valued at over $6 million. The Milwaukee Police Department and FBI jumped swiftly into action, aware of what was at stake of being lost—and that time was of the essence.  Tickets
  9. Lil’ Buck: Real Swan – On the streets, parking lots, and slippery floors of the Crystal Palace Roller Rink in Memphis, Tennessee, Charles “Lil Buck” Riley learned the smooth art of Memphis jookin, igniting a lifelong passion for dance. From the time he was 12 years old, Lil Buck worked to perfect the intricate footwork of jookin, a fluid street dance style that evolved from the Gangsta Walk, as well as the eye-popping isolated jolts of bucking. Quickly, he became one of the most admired street dancers of his generation. Lil Buck won a scholarship to study ballet and took his dancing to a whole new level, merging street-style jookin with classical technique. After a breathtaking video taken of him dancing to Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Swan” accompanied by famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma went viral, Lil Buck’s career exploded. Tickets

Shorts

St. Louis Superman (Part of Shorts: Forces of Nature) – Bruce Franks Jr., a Ferguson activist and battle rapper who was elected to the overwhelmingly white and Republican Missouri House of Representatives, must overcome both personal trauma and political obstacles to pass a critical bill for his community. Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Monday, April 29, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. The Apollo – The Apollo Theater has been a cultural anchor on Harlem’s West 125th St. since 1934, and through its doors have passed the most legendary African American artists of the past nine decades. Academy Award® winning filmmaker and Tribeca alum Roger Ross Williams looks at the storied history of this iconic space while following the Apollo’s inaugural staging of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ acclaimed Between the World and Me. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice – With one of the most memorably stunning voices that has ever hit the airwaves, Linda Ronstadt burst onto the 1960s folk rock music scene in her early twenties. The lead singer of the Stone Poneys, Ronstadt eventually branched out to begin her decades long career as a solo artist, touring the world selling out stadiums and, at one point, setting the record as the highest paid female artist in rock. Most remarkable to this day is her interest in and willingness to jump into new and challenging styles of music, including opera, jazz, and Mexican folk, excelling fantastically with each. Ronstadt has also been an outspoken political advocate for causes such as same-sex marriage and the inhumane treatment of undocumented immigrants, never shying away from fighting for what she believes both on and off the stage. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica – While Bob Marley may be most closely associated with the heyday of reggae music, there are others who did not achieve international stardom, ones who remain popular in Jamaica and among reggae fans, singers and songwriters who maintain the spiritual and social values reflected in their music from the 70s and 80s. Now they will once again sing about those values, as relevant as ever, on an international tour. Inna de Yard captures the musicians—among them Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, and Cedric Myton—as they reacquaint, swap stories, and talk of their lives as they rehearse in a studio in the hills above Kingston in a house adorned with hundreds of old LPs and 45s from back in the day.   Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. Gay Chorus Deep South – To confront a resurgence of faith-based anti-LGBTQ laws brought about in the Trump era, Conductor Tim Seelig leads 300 singers of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus on a bus tour of the deep south, showcasing fine music, confronting political and religious intolerance, and challenging his own troubled past with the church. Joined by the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, they bring a message of music, love, and acceptance to communities often on the frontlines against intolerance.  Tickets
  5. Plucked – Stradivari violins are some of the most sought after and valuable instruments in the world. With violins from his golden period of 1700 to 1725, it is a rare honor to lay your eyes, or hands, on one. That’s why the FBI was faced with a one-of-a-kind case when in January 2014, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Frank Almond was attacked and robbed of the Lipinski Strad—a 1715 Stradivarius violin valued at over $6 million. The Milwaukee Police Department and FBI jumped swiftly into action, aware of what was at stake of being lost—and that time was of the essence.  Tickets

Shorts

  1. This Perfect Day (Part of Shorts: Express Yourself) – Across the street, a music store is closing. With only a few minutes to make their move, Julia (Michelle Keating) realizes it’s time for them to face their fears. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Metronome (In Time) (Part of Shorts: Streetwise) – In this wordless fable, an ailing elderly maestro (David Patrick Kelly) and a young piano prodigy (Gabriel Gurevich) venture out of their musical isolation in hopes of selling their beloved piano.  Tickets
  3. St. Louis Superman (Part of Shorts: Forces of Nature) – Bruce Franks Jr., a Ferguson activist and battle rapper who was elected to the overwhelmingly white and Republican Missouri House of Representatives, must overcome both personal trauma and political obstacles to pass a critical bill for his community. Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Tuesday, April 30, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation – When business partners John Roberts and Joel Rosenman floated the idea of hosting an opening day party with live music to celebrate their new recording studio in Woodstock, New York, they had no idea what it would eventually become: a pilgrimage of 500,000 like-minded radicals and hippies to Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, where they would find spiritual reassurance and release in a celebration of freedom. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Sublime – Iconic California band Sublime fused reggae, punk, ska, dub, and hip-hop into a genre-defying new sound that electrified audiences and airways in the mid-1990s. Drawing a rabid fanbase around the globe, Sublime became a musical touchstone for a generation, and a lasting influence on the musicians that came after. Their behind-the-scenes story is just as absorbing—a group of friends with big ideas and big ambition, who rode the wave of growing fame to greater heights and longer nights. And while their story was interrupted by tragedy, that tragedy wouldn’t be their final chapter. Tickets
  3. Lost Transmissions – After a memorable introduction at a party, aspiring songwriter Hannah (Juno Temple) falls under the spell of talented record producer Theo Ross (Simon Pegg). As they become fast friends and begin to collaborate, Hannah discovers that Theo is a schizophrenic who refuses to take his medication. As Hannah’s career begins to take off, Theo’s condition worsens, and he lashes out at friends trying to help him. Undeterred, Hannah undertakes the difficult task of helping Theo salvage his place in the unforgiving Los Angeles music industry while at the same time getting him into treatment. The numerous obstacles thrown in her way reveal the disturbing inadequacies of mental health care in America. Tickets
  4. Gay Chorus Deep South – To confront a resurgence of faith-based anti-LGBTQ laws brought about in the Trump era, Conductor Tim Seelig leads 300 singers of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus on a bus tour of the deep south, showcasing fine music, confronting political and religious intolerance, and challenging his own troubled past with the church. Joined by the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, they bring a message of music, love, and acceptance to communities often on the frontlines against intolerance.  Tickets
  5. Lil’ Buck: Real Swan – On the streets, parking lots, and slippery floors of the Crystal Palace Roller Rink in Memphis, Tennessee, Charles “Lil Buck” Riley learned the smooth art of Memphis jookin, igniting a lifelong passion for dance. From the time he was 12 years old, Lil Buck worked to perfect the intricate footwork of jookin, a fluid street dance style that evolved from the Gangsta Walk, as well as the eye-popping isolated jolts of bucking. Quickly, he became one of the most admired street dancers of his generation. Lil Buck won a scholarship to study ballet and took his dancing to a whole new level, merging street-style jookin with classical technique. After a breathtaking video taken of him dancing to Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Swan” accompanied by famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma went viral, Lil Buck’s career exploded. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Snare (Part of Shorts: Roads Less Traveled) – At an aging Chinese restaurant in 1997, a dad (Steve Rodgers) asks his punk musician son (James Fraser) to help him follow his dreams. Tickets

Talks

Tribeca Talks: Storytellers – Questlove with Boots Riley –  Questlove is an iconic drummer, DJ, producer, culinary entrepreneur, New York Times best-selling author, and, as a member of The Roots, the unmistakable heartbeat of Philadelphia’s most influential hip-hop group. He is the Musical Director for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, where his Roots crew serves as house band. Beyond that, this five-time Grammy Award®-winning musician’s indisputable reputation has landed him musical directing positions with everyone from D’Angelo and Eminem to Jay-Z. Joining Questlove in conversation is groundbreaking musician and filmmaker Boots Riley, who is best known as the lead vocalist for the hip-hop group The Coup as well as the writer and director of the acclaimed, revolutionary breakout film Sorry to Bother You. Together, these visionary artists will discuss their boundless and eclectic careers.  Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Wednesday, May 1, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo! is an intimate and revealing portrait of a legend-in-the-making, Devil’s Pie—D’Angelo buzzes with the soulful intensity of its subject, Grammy Award winning R&B artist D’Angelo. Never-before-seen live footage and painfully honest interviews combine to present this once larger-than-life superstar at his most vulnerable. The film traces the unexpected path of D’Angelo’s career and personal life, from his meteoric rise to his sudden disappearance and 14 year absence from the public eye.   Tickets  [STAFF PICK]
  2. Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica – While Bob Marley may be most closely associated with the heyday of reggae music, there are others who did not achieve international stardom, ones who remain popular in Jamaica and among reggae fans, singers and songwriters who maintain the spiritual and social values reflected in their music from the 70s and 80s. Now they will once again sing about those values, as relevant as ever, on an international tour. Inna de Yard captures the musicians—among them Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, and Cedric Myton—as they reacquaint, swap stories, and talk of their lives as they rehearse in a studio in the hills above Kingston in a house adorned with hundreds of old LPs and 45s from back in the day.   Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation – When business partners John Roberts and Joel Rosenman floated the idea of hosting an opening day party with live music to celebrate their new recording studio in Woodstock, New York, they had no idea what it would eventually become: a pilgrimage of 500,000 like-minded radicals and hippies to Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, where they would find spiritual reassurance and release in a celebration of freedom. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. I Want My MTV – A touchstone in the lives of millions of young people, as well as a home for musicians and filmmakers to display their frequently offbeat sense of artistic vision, upstart music network MTV burst onto televisions on August 1, 1981. Via a combination of the scrappy handful of young adults serving as hosts, the fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants production style, and the music mini-movies that were the foundation of the original channel, MTV was like nothing Americans had ever seen before. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  5. Sublime – Iconic California band Sublime fused reggae, punk, ska, dub, and hip-hop into a genre-defying new sound that electrified audiences and airways in the mid-1990s. Drawing a rabid fanbase around the globe, Sublime became a musical touchstone for a generation, and a lasting influence on the musicians that came after. Their behind-the-scenes story is just as absorbing—a group of friends with big ideas and big ambition, who rode the wave of growing fame to greater heights and longer nights. And while their story was interrupted by tragedy, that tragedy wouldn’t be their final chapter. Tickets
  6. Wild Rose – Rose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley) has recently been released from jail. Forced to wear an ankle monitor and observe a strict curfew, she is unable to return to her job bringing down the house nightly as the lead singer at Glasgow’s own Grand Ole Opry. Resigned, she takes a gig as a house cleaner for the affluent Susannah (Sophie Okonedo), who immediately notices Harlan’s raw talent and authentic country music chops. Together they hatch a plan to get her to the big time in Nashville. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Shorts: On Tour – Music docs that speak to heart and soul. Tickets [STAFF PICK] Tickets
    • Xmas Cake – This American Shelf-Life – A coming-of-middle-age story about a female singers’ journey from hot to not, and what ensues across cultures—from New York to Tokyo. Tickets
    • Lost Weekend – In 1984, two friends from small town Pennsylvania win an MTV contest and the chance to party with Van Halen for 48 Hours. Tickets
    • A Song Can’t BurnA Song Can’t Burn follows a Scottish musician working with refugee children who have crossed the border from Syria to Lebanon. Tickets
    • LazarusLazarus is a short documentary following Lazarus Chigwandali, a street musician with Albinism from Malawi as he teams up with a London-based music producer to record his debut album. Tickets
    • That’s My Jazz – Milt Abel II, a world-renowned pastry chef, reflects on his relationship with his deceased father Milton Abel Sr., famed Kansas City jazz musician. Tickets
  2. St. Louis Superman (Part of Shorts: Forces of Nature) – Bruce Franks Jr., a Ferguson activist and battle rapper who was elected to the overwhelmingly white and Republican Missouri House of Representatives, must overcome both personal trauma and political obstacles to pass a critical bill for his community. Tickets

Talks

Tribeca Talks: Storytellers – Rashida Jones – Versatile actor, director, screenwriter, producer, and Harvard graduate Rashida Jones will be in conversation to discuss an illustrious and accomplished career that spans across a variety of mediums. She co-wrote and starred in the indie breakout film Celeste and Jesse Forever, and received widespread acclaim for her sophomore directorial effort Quincy—an intimate portrait of her father and music legend Quincy Jones. She is the executive producer of the TNT hit-series Claws and currently stars on the TBS series Angie TribecaTickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Thursday, May 2, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. The Remix: Hip-Hop X Fashion – As hip hop music was taking off in the late 80s and 90s, associated fashion trends and styles were also making their voice heard. And both were largely dominated by men. But as the voices of Mary J. Blige, Missy Elliott, and Lil’ Kim grew louder, so too did the influence of their female designers and stylists working behind the scenes. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Knives and Skin – Surreal forces lurk behind the fluorescent facade of an unassuming Midwestern town in Jennifer Reeder’s hyper-stylized Knives And Skin. Sophomore year of high school is upended when Carolyn Harper (Raven Whitley) suddenly vanishes after being abandoned at the lake by her jock boyfriend (Ty Olwin). In the wake of Carolyn’s mysterious disappearance, a dark abyss widens among the inhabitants of Big River as the ripples of anxiety and mistrust begin to permeate through the high school halls and beyond. In a series of intertwined suburban vignettes, fear and loss cause the members of Carolyn’s inner-circle to develop unexpected and desperate coping strategies as they slowly begin to unravel under the impact of their grief and suspicions. Tickets
  3. All I Can SayShannon Hoon, the lead singer of alt rock band Blind Melon, used a Hi-8 video camera to film himself from 1990 to 1995. Until the day he died, his camera was both his diary and his closest confidant. Grammy-award winning director Danny Clinch, along with Taryn Gould, Colleen Hennessy, and Hoon himself, create a window into the late singer’s state of mind with this meticulously documented, intimate account of the frontman’s family, his creative process, his band’s rise to fame, and his struggle with addiction. Tickets
  4. Gully -. Set in a dystopian Los Angeles, Gully focuses on three best friends—Calvin (Jacob Latimore), Nicky (Charlie Plummer) and Jesse (Kelvin Harrison Jr.)—who struggle to survive in the bleak and alien environment. Traumatized by troubled family relationships and socioeconomic hardships, they seek escape through video games, doing drugs, and hard partying, which provide only a temporary relief from their pain. After a shattering and unexpected discovery, the boys further lose touch with reality and lash out through dangerous acts of violence and revenge that lead to an uncertain future. Tickets
  5. Gay Chorus Deep South – To confront a resurgence of faith-based anti-LGBTQ laws brought about in the Trump era, Conductor Tim Seelig leads 300 singers of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus on a bus tour of the deep south, showcasing fine music, confronting political and religious intolerance, and challenging his own troubled past with the church. Joined by the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, they bring a message of music, love, and acceptance to communities often on the frontlines against intolerance.  Tickets
  6. The Quiet One – Throughout his life, Bill Wyman, one of the original members of The Rolling Stones, shot hours of unseen film footage, took thousands of photographs, and collected a vast archive of memorabilia. He also kept a detailed diary to accompany these treasures. The film unveils this one-of-a-kind collection, alongside interviews with his family and friends, taking the audience on a first-hand journey through Wyman’s extraordinary experiences. Known by his former bandmates as a man of few words, the notoriously private bass player opens up to the camera, revealing the icons who inspired him to be a musician, from Chuck Berry and Ray Charles to Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Wyman describes with modesty and vulnerability how he stayed grounded while seizing the meaningful moments that made up his thirty years touring the world with the Stones.  Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Friday, May 3, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica – While Bob Marley may be most closely associated with the heyday of reggae music, there are others who did not achieve international stardom, ones who remain popular in Jamaica and among reggae fans, singers and songwriters who maintain the spiritual and social values reflected in their music from the 70s and 80s. Now they will once again sing about those values, as relevant as ever, on an international tour. Inna de Yard captures the musicians—among them Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus I, and Cedric Myton—as they reacquaint, swap stories, and talk of their lives as they rehearse in a studio in the hills above Kingston in a house adorned with hundreds of old LPs and 45s from back in the day.   Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. The Remix: Hip-Hop X Fashion – As hip hop music was taking off in the late 80s and 90s, associated fashion trends and styles were also making their voice heard. And both were largely dominated by men. But as the voices of Mary J. Blige, Missy Elliott, and Lil’ Kim grew louder, so too did the influence of their female designers and stylists working behind the scenes. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. I Want My MTV – A touchstone in the lives of millions of young people, as well as a home for musicians and filmmakers to display their frequently offbeat sense of artistic vision, upstart music network MTV burst onto televisions on August 1, 1981. Via a combination of the scrappy handful of young adults serving as hosts, the fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants production style, and the music mini-movies that were the foundation of the original channel, MTV was like nothing Americans had ever seen before. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. Charlie’s Records – Rawlston Charles migrated from Tobago and entered the United States in December 1967. Living in Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, NY, Charles had a vision to promote Calypso and Soca music and its artist to the world through his record store, Charlie’s Calypso City, and music label, Charlie’s Records. Charlie’s Records reveals the American Immigrant story of an unsung hero. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  5. Lost Transmissions – After a memorable introduction at a party, aspiring songwriter Hannah (Juno Temple) falls under the spell of talented record producer Theo Ross (Simon Pegg). As they become fast friends and begin to collaborate, Hannah discovers that Theo is a schizophrenic who refuses to take his medication. As Hannah’s career begins to take off, Theo’s condition worsens, and he lashes out at friends trying to help him. Undeterred, Hannah undertakes the difficult task of helping Theo salvage his place in the unforgiving Los Angeles music industry while at the same time getting him into treatment. The numerous obstacles thrown in her way reveal the disturbing inadequacies of mental health care in America. Tickets
  6. Plucked – Stradivari violins are some of the most sought after and valuable instruments in the world. With violins from his golden period of 1700 to 1725, it is a rare honor to lay your eyes, or hands, on one. That’s why the FBI was faced with a one-of-a-kind case when in January 2014, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Frank Almond was attacked and robbed of the Lipinski Strad—a 1715 Stradivarius violin valued at over $6 million. The Milwaukee Police Department and FBI jumped swiftly into action, aware of what was at stake of being lost—and that time was of the essence.  Tickets
  7. Wild Rose – Rose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley) has recently been released from jail. Forced to wear an ankle monitor and observe a strict curfew, she is unable to return to her job bringing down the house nightly as the lead singer at Glasgow’s own Grand Ole Opry. Resigned, she takes a gig as a house cleaner for the affluent Susannah (Sophie Okonedo), who immediately notices Harlan’s raw talent and authentic country music chops. Together they hatch a plan to get her to the big time in Nashville. Tickets
  8. The Quiet One – Throughout his life, Bill Wyman, one of the original members of The Rolling Stones, shot hours of unseen film footage, took thousands of photographs, and collected a vast archive of memorabilia. He also kept a detailed diary to accompany these treasures. The film unveils this one-of-a-kind collection, alongside interviews with his family and friends, taking the audience on a first-hand journey through Wyman’s extraordinary experiences. Known by his former bandmates as a man of few words, the notoriously private bass player opens up to the camera, revealing the icons who inspired him to be a musician, from Chuck Berry and Ray Charles to Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Wyman describes with modesty and vulnerability how he stayed grounded while seizing the meaningful moments that made up his thirty years touring the world with the Stones.  Tickets
  9. Lil’ Buck: Real Swan – On the streets, parking lots, and slippery floors of the Crystal Palace Roller Rink in Memphis, Tennessee, Charles “Lil Buck” Riley learned the smooth art of Memphis jookin, igniting a lifelong passion for dance. From the time he was 12 years old, Lil Buck worked to perfect the intricate footwork of jookin, a fluid street dance style that evolved from the Gangsta Walk, as well as the eye-popping isolated jolts of bucking. Quickly, he became one of the most admired street dancers of his generation. Lil Buck won a scholarship to study ballet and took his dancing to a whole new level, merging street-style jookin with classical technique. After a breathtaking video taken of him dancing to Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Swan” accompanied by famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma went viral, Lil Buck’s career exploded. Tickets

Shorts

  1. Shorts: On Tour – Music docs that speak to heart and soul. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
    • Xmas Cake – This American Shelf-Life – A coming-of-middle-age story about a female singers’ journey from hot to not, and what ensues across cultures—from New York to Tokyo. Tickets
    • Lost Weekend – In 1984, two friends from small town Pennsylvania win an MTV contest and the chance to party with Van Halen for 48 Hours. Tickets
    • A Song Can’t BurnA Song Can’t Burn follows a Scottish musician working with refugee children who have crossed the border from Syria to Lebanon. Tickets
    • LazarusLazarus is a short documentary following Lazarus Chigwandali, a street musician with Albinism from Malawi as he teams up with a London-based music producer to record his debut album. Tickets
    • That’s My Jazz – Milt Abel II, a world-renowned pastry chef, reflects on his relationship with his deceased father Milton Abel Sr., famed Kansas City jazz musician. Tickets
  2. Snare (Part of Shorts: Roads Less Traveled) – At an aging Chinese restaurant in 1997, a dad (Steve Rodgers) asks his punk musician son (James Fraser) to help him follow his dreams. Tickets
  3. Metronome (In Time) (Part of Shorts: Streetwise) – In this wordless fable, an ailing elderly maestro (David Patrick Kelly) and a young piano prodigy (Gabriel Gurevich) venture out of their musical isolation in hopes of selling their beloved piano.  Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Saturday, May 4, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Mystify: Michael Hutchence – In the 1980s and ‘90s, Michael Hutchence was flying high and topping the charts as the lead singer of the hugely successful Australian rock band INXS. There was, however, a darkness that always hovered behind the spotlight. Hutchence, a man who saw rock and roll as “liberation,” was a natural performer who channeled his unique brand of exuberant vocals and charismatic sex appeal onto the stage until his untimely death at the age of 37. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  2. Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation – When business partners John Roberts and Joel Rosenman floated the idea of hosting an opening day party with live music to celebrate their new recording studio in Woodstock, New York, they had no idea what it would eventually become: a pilgrimage of 500,000 like-minded radicals and hippies to Max Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, where they would find spiritual reassurance and release in a celebration of freedom. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. The Remix: Hip-Hop X Fashion – As hip hop music was taking off in the late 80s and 90s, associated fashion trends and styles were also making their voice heard. And both were largely dominated by men. But as the voices of Mary J. Blige, Missy Elliott, and Lil’ Kim grew louder, so too did the influence of their female designers and stylists working behind the scenes. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  4. I Want My MTV – A touchstone in the lives of millions of young people, as well as a home for musicians and filmmakers to display their frequently offbeat sense of artistic vision, upstart music network MTV burst onto televisions on August 1, 1981. Via a combination of the scrappy handful of young adults serving as hosts, the fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants production style, and the music mini-movies that were the foundation of the original channel, MTV was like nothing Americans had ever seen before. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  5. Goldie – Goldie (Slick Woods) is a street-wise, 18-year-old dancer with big dreams of big fame, even as she is stuck at home minding her two sisters while their mother is in jail. When an opportunity to audition for a real music video comes her way, Goldie feels the time has finally come for her star to rise. All she needs is the perfect canary yellow fur coat she has had her eye on in a local vintage store window. But with the day of the shoot rapidly approaching, and Goldie’s pockets still empty of the cash needed to purchase the coat, her desire for it—and its perceived promise of transformation—becomes an all-consuming obsession. Tickets
  6. Wild Rose – Rose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley) has recently been released from jail. Forced to wear an ankle monitor and observe a strict curfew, she is unable to return to her job bringing down the house nightly as the lead singer at Glasgow’s own Grand Ole Opry. Resigned, she takes a gig as a house cleaner for the affluent Susannah (Sophie Okonedo), who immediately notices Harlan’s raw talent and authentic country music chops. Together they hatch a plan to get her to the big time in Nashville. Tickets
  7. The Quiet One – Throughout his life, Bill Wyman, one of the original members of The Rolling Stones, shot hours of unseen film footage, took thousands of photographs, and collected a vast archive of memorabilia. He also kept a detailed diary to accompany these treasures. The film unveils this one-of-a-kind collection, alongside interviews with his family and friends, taking the audience on a first-hand journey through Wyman’s extraordinary experiences. Known by his former bandmates as a man of few words, the notoriously private bass player opens up to the camera, revealing the icons who inspired him to be a musician, from Chuck Berry and Ray Charles to Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Wyman describes with modesty and vulnerability how he stayed grounded while seizing the meaningful moments that made up his thirty years touring the world with the Stones.  Tickets

Shorts

  1. Shorts: On Tour – Music docs that speak to heart and soul. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
    • Xmas Cake – This American Shelf-Life – A coming-of-middle-age story about a female singers’ journey from hot to not, and what ensues across cultures—from New York to Tokyo. Tickets
    • Lost Weekend – In 1984, two friends from small town Pennsylvania win an MTV contest and the chance to party with Van Halen for 48 Hours. Tickets
    • A Song Can’t BurnA Song Can’t Burn follows a Scottish musician working with refugee children who have crossed the border from Syria to Lebanon. Tickets
    • LazarusLazarus is a short documentary following Lazarus Chigwandali, a street musician with Albinism from Malawi as he teams up with a London-based music producer to record his debut album. Tickets
    • That’s My Jazz – Milt Abel II, a world-renowned pastry chef, reflects on his relationship with his deceased father Milton Abel Sr., famed Kansas City jazz musician. Tickets
  2. This Perfect Day (Part of Shorts: Express Yourself) – Across the street, a music store is closing. With only a few minutes to make their move, Julia (Michelle Keating) realizes it’s time for them to face their fears. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. Snare (Part of Shorts: Roads Less Traveled) – At an aging Chinese restaurant in 1997, a dad (Steve Rodgers) asks his punk musician son (James Fraser) to help him follow his dreams. Tickets
  4. Metronome (In Time) (Part of Shorts: Streetwise) – In this wordless fable, an ailing elderly maestro (David Patrick Kelly) and a young piano prodigy (Gabriel Gurevich) venture out of their musical isolation in hopes of selling their beloved piano.  Tickets
  5. St. Louis Superman (Part of Shorts: Forces of Nature) – Bruce Franks Jr., a Ferguson activist and battle rapper who was elected to the overwhelmingly white and Republican Missouri House of Representatives, must overcome both personal trauma and political obstacles to pass a critical bill for his community. Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

Sunday, May 5, 2018

Features/Documentaries

  1. Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo! is an intimate and revealing portrait of a legend-in-the-making, Devil’s Pie—D’Angelo buzzes with the soulful intensity of its subject, Grammy Award winning R&B artist D’Angelo. Never-before-seen live footage and painfully honest interviews combine to present this once larger-than-life superstar at his most vulnerable. The film traces the unexpected path of D’Angelo’s career and personal life, from his meteoric rise to his sudden disappearance and 14 year absence from the public eye.   Tickets  [STAFF PICK]
  2. Other Music – Other Music was not just a record store in the village. it was a place where a generation discovered groundbreaking artists who became larger than life icons in the music scene. It was a destination for music lovers, musicians, and industry representatives, where bands were formed and careers were launched. Other Music was and remains a symbol of independent music. It was a place that not only spotlighted those in independent music, but also served as a great influence on the music scene in New York City. Tickets [STAFF PICK]
  3. All I Can Say – Shannon Hoon, the lead singer of alt rock band Blind Melon, used a Hi-8 video camera to film himself from 1990 to 1995. Until the day he died, his camera was both his diary and his closest confidant. Grammy-award winning director Danny Clinch, along with Taryn Gould, Colleen Hennessy, and Hoon himself, create a window into the late singer’s state of mind with this meticulously documented, intimate account of the frontman’s family, his creative process, his band’s rise to fame, and his struggle with addiction. Tickets
  4. Plucked – Stradivari violins are some of the most sought after and valuable instruments in the world. With violins from his golden period of 1700 to 1725, it is a rare honor to lay your eyes, or hands, on one. That’s why the FBI was faced with a one-of-a-kind case when in January 2014, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Frank Almond was attacked and robbed of the Lipinski Strad—a 1715 Stradivarius violin valued at over $6 million. The Milwaukee Police Department and FBI jumped swiftly into action, aware of what was at stake of being lost—and that time was of the essence.  Tickets

Tribeca Festival Hub

  1. Armonia – Armonia takes the ride of the dynamic original piano concerto “Armonia Degli Uccelli,” and marries it to a universally accessible animation, to produce a uniquely layered spectacle of spatial storytelling. Supported by Tribeca Film Institute.  More Info [STAFF PICK]
  2. Into The Light –  Ascend Spring Studios and move through the movements of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor,” performed by the legendary Yo-Yo Ma.  More Info [STAFF PICK]

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